5 Amazing Mexican Projects Revolving Around Wood

Wood is one of the most versatile building materials, being widely used by architects and interior designers and very appreciated for its renewable nature and wide variety of applications. This material is also cost-effective and if you add that to the list of numerous other advantages it becomes clear that wood can be used to create a lot of innovative and very cool structures. Below you can have a look at some of our top favorite Mexico-based projects revolving around wood.

Azulik Resort in Tulum

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The Azulik resort is located on Mexico’s Caribbean coast close to Tulum. It’s a wonderful little piece of paradise where one can take some time off to relax in the middle of nature with no electricity or any of the usual commodities such as TVs or even phones. It’s a place of simplicity completely detached from the digital world. As you can see for yourself, wood is  the primary material used throughout the resort, the one that gives it character. The rustic design and organic architecture make this a one-of-a-kind vacation destination able to offer a memorable and unique experience.

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Treehouse-style villa

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Somewhere along the beach in Guerrero, Mexico lies a beautiful treehouse-style villa designed by studio Deture Culsign, Architecture+Interiors. It’s built mostly out of wood which helps it blend into the landscape quite naturally and seamlessly but also gives it a rather exception appearance. A variety of other materials were used to give this cool retreat a cozy as well vibrant and tropical vibe. The roof is covered with clay tiles, the’s a pebble floor in the shower and the bathroom sink is carved out of stone. Bamboo remains the major resource features throughout the entire design.

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Una Vida Boutique Villas

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The Tulum region in Quintana Roo, Mexico is also home to a series of modern villas designed by Studio arquitectos. The project’s intent was to offer a set of villas with different structures which would offer customers freedom and flexibility in the form of different booking options. Before the project even began a land survey gave the architect a clear view over the area allowing them to take measures for preserving as many of the trees as possible. The villas form a little village in the middle of the rainforest. They have rustic designs and wood is a major components in the project, although not as prominent as in other cases.

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Casa Media Perra

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Casa Media Perra is a private residence designed by studio Santos Bolívar and located in Guadalupe, Mexico. The rugged topography of the site partially dictated the final design and overall structure of the house. The building is raised on columns made out of wood and steel and this leaves an open area beneath, allowing the structure to have minimal impact on the landscape and also made the whole building process easier. At the same time, the views are quite majestic from up there.

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Artia in Tulum

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The last project on today’s list is also located in Tulum and is called Artia. It’s a private condominium composed of 21 apartments. It was a project developed by studio AS Architecture in collaboration with CO-LAB Design Office. The apartments are organized in three levels and topped with a rooftop terrace/ garden area. The structure was built using traditional techniques and locally-sourced materials which include hardwoods and stone. By placing the building at the back of the lot the architects managed to preserve all the trees at the front and to create a beautiful tropical garden. The wood-covered exterior gives the structure a very welcoming look and also helps it blend into the surroundings. It also goes really well with the whole tropical and eco-friendly nature of this entire project.

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