Houses That Rise From Ruins To Become Modern Homes

When a structure becomes a ruin, that’s usually the end of it. In a few cases, however, that’s just the end of a chapter. From those ruins rise new structures which instead of wiping out any trace of the old building are designed to instead embrace the history of the site. This is how these houses came to be. They’re the link between past and present and they celebrate the unique charm of the ruins that surround them, making them a part of their design.

House in Melgaço from Nuno Brandão CostaView in gallery

Low House in Melgaço from Nuno Brandão CostaView in gallery

Ruins House in Melgaço from Nuno Brandão CostaView in gallery

House in Melgaço from Nuno Brandão Costa With Large windowView in gallery

House in Melgaço from Nuno Brandão Costa interiorView in gallery

House in Melgaço from Nuno Brandão Costa fenceView in gallery

This is a house located in Parada do Monte, in Portugal. It covers an area that measures 349 square meters and it was built here in 2016 by Nuno Brandao Costa. The existing ruins inspired the architects to build an extension to the original house and to blur the boundaries between past and present by using local materials. The extension contains the lounge area and three bedrooms and it’s a partially underground structure. On one side it features a stone wall made with materials from a demolished local building.

E-C House from SAMI-arquitectosView in gallery

E-C House from SAMI-arquitectos FenceView in gallery

E-C House from SAMI-arquitectos WindowView in gallery

Living room from E-C House from SAMI-arquitectosView in gallery

E-C House from SAMI-arquitectos KitchenView in gallery

As it turns out, Portugal hides a bunch of similar gems. One of them is the E/C House built by SAMI-arquitectos in 2013 on Pico Island. The starting point for the project was a ruin. The architects and the clients were immediately drawn to this historic feature and agreed to find a way to preserve it and to value it. The holiday house that was built here takes advantage of the ruin. In fact, the house was built inside these ruins, with openings that line up with the ones of the former building, allowing the stone walls to become a frame for the new structure.

Cabrela House by Orgânica ArquitecturaView in gallery

Old struture Cabrela House by Orgânica ArquitecturaView in gallery

Cabrela House by Orgânica Arquitectura Old and NewView in gallery

Cabrela House by Orgânica Arquitectura BedroomView in gallery

Organica Arquitectura also built an interesting residence in Portugal. This time the house is situated in Sintra and covers an area of only 142 square meters. There were still parts of an old structure on the site and they were recovered and integrated into the new design. The residence appears to emerge out of the ruins. The exterior walls of the old structure were preserved and the new house was built inside of them, extending to the back of the site.

House of Ruins ArchitectureView in gallery

House of Ruins Architecture DesignView in gallery

House of Ruins Architecture BackyardView in gallery

This house in Saka, Latvia uses the ruins of an old structure as a shield against the strong winds but also as a cover that lets it blend in more easily and become a part of the landscape. The building was designed by NRJA back in 2002 and was named House in Ruins. The ruins are from a 19th century traditional barn and they allowed the architects to use strong contrasts in their favor. The new, modern house with its glass facades and clean lines is set against the rough stone walls and the result is a really interesting combo.

Old Farmhouse into two-storey residenceView in gallery

Old Farmhouse into two-storey residence Exterior FacadeView in gallery

Old Farmhouse into two-storey residence architecutreView in gallery

Old Farmhouse into two-storey residence interiorView in gallery

Located in Northern Italy, this holiday home hides inside the ruins of an old farmhouse. These were integrated into the new two-storey residence and the architects at Bergmeisterwolf successfully blended the two styles by using traditional stonemason techniques to rebuild the old walls and to recreate their original design. They also used pre-weathered wood on some of the walls and charred timber for the garage situated at the rear of the site.

Buchner Brundler Architekten Lost in Nature HouseView in gallery

Buchner Brundler Architekten Concrete InteriorView in gallery

Buchner Brundler Architekten LivingView in gallery

Buchner Brundler Architekten Natural Decor for BathroomView in gallery

Speaking of houses with old and deceiving shells, check out this 200 year old home renovated by Buchner Brundler Architekten. It’s a charming summer home that doesn’t look very promising on the outside. However, that’s just a cover. The interior couldn’t be more contrasting. Inside the house the design is clean, minimalist and filled with light which comes as a surprise considering how rustic and unassuming the exterior is. You could easily assume this is a ruin, forgotten by everyone, but you’d be very wrong.

Fernando Coelho- RM House FacadeView in gallery

Fernando Coelho- RM HouseView in gallery

Fernando Coelho- RM House Glass RailingView in gallery

Fernando Coelho- RM House RoofView in gallery

Fernando Coelho- RM House House DecorView in gallery

Fernando Coelho- RM House KitchenView in gallery

In 2013 architect Fernando Coelho completed the RM House, a very special residence located in Felgueiras, Portugal. It occupies an area of 540 square meters and it was built within the walls of two old ruins. The outer walls were consolidated and part of the roofs was demolished. The new structure emerges from these ruins and follows the natural curves of the terrain. It’s organized on two floors with a clear distinction between the public and private areas.

Maclean-Bristol House, ScotlandView in gallery

The White House ExtensionView in gallery

ruins The White HouseView in gallery

The White House Modern DesignView in gallery

Living room of the The White HouseView in gallery

This is the White House, a private residence situated on Coll Island in Scotland. From a distance, it looks like a ruin and it actually is in a sense. WT Architecture came up with a plan to consolidate the structure and to transform it into a modern home. The spectacular property has a beautiful glazed design concealed inside the massive stone walls. The project was completed in 2010.

WT Architecture the MillView in gallery

WT Architecture the Mill InteriorView in gallery

WT Architecture the Mill KitchenView in gallery

WT Architecture the Mill LivingView in gallery

WT Architecture the Mill ExteriorView in gallery

The creative team from WT Architecture is also responsible for the wonderful conversion of this old mill on the Scottish Borders. The project concerns the transformation of the mill into a modern residence. This was done by preserving and consolidating the original stone walls and building a new independent structure within these. Completed in 2014, the project was a finalist at the RIBA House of the Year awards in 2015.