Oxblood Color: What Is With The Obsession?

When it comes to picking out furniture or painting your walls, you really want to get it right the first time. While you will never know if you got the “perfect” color for each project, you can fall in love with one.

This is usually your best bet because as long as you love the color and how it works with your space, you can know that it is the right choice. Perhaps a color you haven’t heard of is what is best for your project. 

One of those rare colors is known as oxblood. Some people like red, others like burgundy. Then there are those who have been introduced to a wonderful color called oxblood and it can be absolutely stunning. 

What Is Oxblood Color?

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The name for this color may draw you in and it may be offputting. But don’t let either affect whether or not you choose the oxblood color for your home. Because it is the color itself that should make the final decision. 

Oxblood isn’t a bright red as one might assume but it is a mixture of burgundy and brown. This makes it deep, warm and inviting. The best part about the color is that it can be a neutral color or it can be a splash of color. 

Because it comes in a few different shades, it can be used as a backdrop for other colors or as a bright color amongst more neutral colors. It really is quite versatile and is gorgeous if used correctly to complement other colors. 

Oxblood Vs. Burgundy

A lot of people confuse the two of these colors so it is best if we clear some things up before we begin. While the shades of these colors can overlap, in general, they are different colors used for different purposes.

Oxblood looks like burgundy to the untrained eye but has less purple and more brown in it. Burgundy has hints of purple but oxblood has very little. Cordovan is another similar term used that is more burgundy than oxblood.

Then we have maroon which is much more purple than oxblood. So if you want a burgundy or maroon with less purple then choose oxblood because it is a purer color with more reds and browns than the others. 

What Color Goes Good With Oxblood?

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There are many colors that go well with oxblood. But to get started, we are going to talk about some safe colors to choose for those who want something that is sure and those who prefer not to take risks in this area of their life. 

These colors always work out when used with oxblood. So if you are unsure where to start then you can start with these colors. Most of them are neutrals so you can use oxblood anyway that you like with them.

Black

To be honest, black is a safe color for matching most colors. It can go with both warm and cool colors and really make the color stand out. With light colors, black stands out, with dark colors, the color stands out.

But with oxblood, which is normally dark, with the possibility to be medium, it really is special. The marriage of the two colors really let you know that some matches are made in heaven. You can’t go wrong with this duo.

Navy Blue

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Image from Glenn Gissler Design

Navy is another winner when it comes to most colors but there’s something special about the way it looks with oxblood. The two have been together for a long time. Red and blue that is. But shade really matters here.

We will talk about other blues later but for now, the focus on navy blue is important because it’s the safest blue you can use the pairing a blue with oxblood. The richest of each really works well with the other. 

Light Blue

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Image from Fearins | Welch Interior Design

If you don’t love navy then you can choose light blue for oxblood. The two are also really great together. A lot of people think that when choosing oxblood you are locked into choosing a dark color to match it.

But offsetting the color of the oxblood can be the best choice that you can make. Light blue can do that. The exact shade of the light blue isn’t as important as the shade of the dark blue. So feel free to experiment. 

Gray

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Can you really go wrong with gray? This color can go with absolutely any other color. It would be difficult to find a color that didn’t have a perfect gray match. That’s a challenge that you can take and most likely fail. 

Because gray is universal. When it comes to choosing a shade of gray for oxblood, both charcoal gray and light gray look good. It all depends on the other colors you have in the room and how they will work with the gray.

Tan

Tan is a fairly safe color too but not as safe as gray or blue. Even though it is considered neutral, there are many shades of tan and each of them works differently. Lean towards beige for a safer choice of color. 

When it comes to matching tan with oxblood, a dark to medium tan usually looks best. Get too light without going beige and you could end up with clashing colors. So be careful when working with light tans. 

Colors To Try With Oxblood Color

When it comes to interior and exterior design, it can be fun to try new things. These colors go well with oxblood but most people aren’t brave enough to try them out. If you feel up to it, you can try one of them.

Beware though that it is easy to mess up the combos with these colors. It is recommended to experiment a bit before committing to the pairs. If you do it wrong then it could look tacky. But do it right and you can create magic.

Coral

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Coral is a color that can be easy to work with when paired with the right alternate color. But if done wrong, it can look cheap and offputting. For coral and oxblood pairs, it is best to make oxblood a neutral color.

In fact, trying to make the oxblood disappear unless the details are looked at is usually a good choice. Using oxblood as a stain in a cherrywood-like way is a good choice too because it keeps with the neutral vibe.

Turquoise 

Turquoise is another bold color that usually either creates magic or falls flat. It used to be a color used only in beach houses and teen rooms, but today, it has opened up a whole new world of magic.

Oxblood is an interesting color to pair turquoise with that no one would ever expect. You can try using light turquoise or even teal, but a deep vintage turquoise usually looks best and creates a good aura. 

Gold

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Image from Susan Jay Design

Gold is perfect if you want something that looks high-end yet traditional. But most people are afraid to experiment with it, fearing that it will make their room look gaudy and overdone. But it can be used carefully. 

When it comes to gold, it’s all about finding the right balance and using the right touches. It can work perfectly with oxblood in many ways, usually with feature pieces of gold and larger amounts of oxblood.

Yellow

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Image from Anthony Baratta LLC

Yellow is a very bold color that is difficult to work with. But if done right, it can really make your room stand out and deserve to be on the cover of a magazine. However, doing this can really be a lot of work.

Using yellow as the only bright color can work but it is usually better to use other bright colors as well to liven up the room. It can become the theme of the room to have the colors bold and fabulous.

Sage

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Image from Pretty Smart

Sage is one of the most calming neutral colors. It goes well with most types of design styles and is very versatile. Oxblood is one of the best colors to go with sage too because we all know that some reds and greens are magic.

You can always choose a lighter green or darker green or something with shades of other colors mixed in. But if you want something timeless and safer than other colors, then choose sage green for your oxblood.

Should I Choose Oxblood?

Oxblood definitely isn’t for everyone. If you don’t like burgundy at all then you probably won’t like oxblood. But if you are a fan of rich colors like oxblood then you will probably fall in love with this color.

If you want something lighter and airier, oxblood probably isn’t for you either. It’s a rich color that will be warm and inviting. It isn’t ideal for beach houses, shabby chic rooms, or even airy farmhouses.

But when it comes down to it, choosing oxblood is all about whether or not you like it. If you do then find somewhere for it to go. If you don’t then choose something that suits you and your home better.