What Is A Hip and Valley Roof?

A hip roof has four sloped sides that come together at a ridge or peak. A hip and valley roof has more than one hipped section that meets at an area called a valley. 

Hip and Valley RoofView in gallery

Hip and valley roofs are intricate but practical for homes with additions, split levels, and unique layouts. They are structurally sound and wind-resistant, but their extra seams make them more likely to leak.

If you’re considering a hip and valley roof for your home, here are the pros, cons, and examples.

What is a Hip and Valley Roof Design?

To understand a hip and valley roof, you first need to understand a hip roof. 

In its simplest form, a hip roof is where all four sides slope. In rectangular homes, the hip sections meet to form a ridge; on square homes, the sides meet at a peak. 

Hip roofs are popular for their structural integrity and high wind resistance. 

A hip and valley roof has multiple hip roofs that connect. Builders may use a hip and valley roof on homes with multiple levels, odd shapes, dormers, and additions for homes that already have a hip roof.

What is the Hip of a Roof?

The hip of a roof is the point where two sloping sides meet. The angle of the hip is known as the hip bevel.

What is a Valley on a Roof?

A valley of a roof is where two roof surfaces connect. For example, in a hip and valley roof, the valley is where two hipped roofs join together.

The Pros and Cons of Hip and Valley Roofs

Like any other style, hip and valley roofs have pros and cons.


The pros of hip and valley roofs:

  • Aesthetically Pleasing – Hip and valley roofs work well with most style homes and can boost curb appeal.
  • Ideal for Heavy Rain  – The slope of hip and valley roofs helps rainwater efficiently run off. 
  • Better Gutter System – Unlike a traditional gable roof, you can have gutters on all four sides of a hip and valley roof.
  • Wind-Resistant – Since hip roofs are self-bracing, they can withstand heavy winds. 

The cons of hip and valley roofs:

  • More Prone to Leaks – The more seams a roof has, the more chances there are for leaks. A hip and valley roof has many seams.
  • Expensive – Some hip and valley roofs are intricate, requiring special roofing knowledge and added expenses.

Hip and Valley Roof Examples

Here are some examples of hip and valley roofs.

Large House with a Hip and Valley Roof

Large House with a Hip and Valley RoofView in gallery
Michael LoBuglio Architects

Here’s an example of a traditional style hip and valley roof on a classic home. The roof features shingles and several valleys where the sections meet.

The hip-style roof gives this home added curb appeal and a timeless look.

Split Level Ranch with Hip and Valley Roof

Split Level Ranch with Hip and Valley RoofView in gallery
Lacy Keller Interiors

Hip and valley roofs work well for homes with multiple levels, like a split-level ranch. 

The split-level ranch features four sections of hip roofs – two large areas covering the main structure and two smaller areas covering the porch and a tiny portion of the home.

Intricate Hip Roof on Two-Story Home

Intricate Hip Roof on Two-Story HomeView in gallery
Raykon Construction

If you want an example of an intricate hip and valley roof, this one checks the box. In this photo, this transitional home features about a dozen hip roofs that connect at valleys.

The roof also has a mix of materials that include sheets of metal and tiles.

New Construction with a Shingle Hip and Valley Roof

New Construction with a Shingle Hip and Valley RoofView in gallery
JDC Remodeling, LLC

Hip and valley roofs are popular for many homes, including brand-new construction. A hip and valley roof marries modern and traditional, making it appropriate for either style.

The material on this roof is standard asphalt shingle.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)FAQ

What kind of material can you use on a hip and valley roof?

Many homes with hip and valley roofs feature shingles. While shingles are most popular, you can also use metal or tiles.

What is a cross-hipped roof?

Builders use a cross-hipped roof on “L” shape structures. The two hipped roofs are laid perpendicular and meet at a valley.

What is the difference between a hip roof and a valley roof?

A hip roof has four sloping sides. A valley in a roof is where two roof surfaces connect. In a hip and valley roof, the valley is where multiple hip roofs meet.

Final Thoughts

Hip and valley roofs feature more than one hip roof on a single structure. The valley is where the two roof surfaces connect. Builders use these roofs on traditional and contemporary structures.

The most significant benefit to hip and valley roofs is they’re wind-resistant. They also allow for better water drainage and superior gutter systems. While hip and valley roofs are aesthetically pleasing, their multiple seams increase the likelihood of leaks.