Sherwin Williams High Reflective White is Ideal for Your Next Project

Sherwin Williams High Reflective White is a super popular white paint color for trim and accents, but also for walls. It’s a pure white with no visible undertones and the company’s brightest white paint.

Sherwin Williams High Reflective WhiteView in gallery

This Paint has a High LRV

It makes sense that a color called High Reflective White has a high Light Reflectance Value or LRV.

The LRV is a scale that runs from 0 to 100, with the brightest hues being 100. At the other end of the scale, absolute black ranks at 0.

This Sherwin Williams paint has an LRV of 93, and is the company’s brightest paint color. In fact, the only color brighter is Behr’s Ultra Pure White that ranks at 94 on the LRV scale

Being so bright, this paint color will look white in pretty much any room.

SW High Reflective Color Quality

For all practical purposes, Sherwin Williams High Reflective White has no undertones.

Despite this, it is important to keep one thing in mind. If you have a great deal of a color in the room, the white will reflect that color. In the end, it may look like it has undertones of that shade.

Warm or Cool?

Although High Reflective White doesn’t have undertones and is neutral, it can lean one way or the other.

Some say that it can trend toward the warm side with a very faint yellow undertone. However, it may look jarring next to a palette of warm beiges and greiges. If you want a paint that is a soft white, Benjamin Moore White Dove might be a better choice.

For the most part, High Reflective White tends to the cooler end of the color spectrum and goes very well with a palette that includes cool colors like blues, greens or purples.  

Pick a Sheen

Lighting isn’t the only thing that can alter the way paint looks. The sheen you choose can also have an impact.

A paint with more sheen can look brighter while a matte finish can appear duller.

This doesn’t mean you have to use the same sheen if you’re painting walls and trim or walls and cabinets. On the contrary, because it’s still the same color, it all blends together.

High Reflective Paint Is Ideal for Trim…and More

High Reflective White is very popular in trim, moldings, built-ins, doors and cabinets. this is because it is so versatile when it comes to matching.

This highly reflective white is also used by many as a wall color as well as ceiling paint.

This super white color also grew in popularity for your home’s exterior. White trim is an ideal use but some homeowners use the same color for at least part of the siding too.

Some designers say that you don’t need a white this bright outdoors and should opt for something less reflective.

Testing samples outdoors is just as important as indoors. It’s the only way to know if you’ll be happy with the color, if it looks the way you expect, and if it matches your other colors.

Alternatives to High Reflective White

Although it is a perfect neutral with no undertones, there might be times when you need something a little different. There are similar white paints that are with considering.

High Reflective White vs. Pure White

High Reflective White vs. Pure WhiteView in gallery

A popular alternate choice that is softer in feel is Sherwin Williams Pure White. This shade is also very popular but has a hint of gray along with barely-there yellow undertones.

It is a very white paint color with just a hint of gray and yellow in its undertones. Pure White has an LRV of 84, making it much less bright, although nowhere near dull. 

High Reflective White vs. Extra White

High Reflective White vs. Extra WhiteView in gallery

Less bright but still quite lively, SW Extra White is popular for trim and cabinetry, but also for walls.

Extra White is a couple of points brighter than Pure White at 86, making it a bit more of an actual color than High Reflective White. Extra White also has blue undertones that make it trend much more to the cool end of the spectrum.

High Reflective White vs. Chantilly Lace

High Reflective White vs. Chantilly LaceView in gallery

Benjamin Moore’s Chantilly Lace is a very pure white with an LRV of 92.2. It is very much like High Reflective White because neither one has strong undertones.

 In fact, BM Chantilly Lace is the company’s whitest white. It tends to change with the quality of light more than High reflective White does.  North-facing light can give it a cooler, slight bluish gray tone. On the other hand, south-facing light can make it trend a little warmer.

Ideas for Pure White Paint Colors

Fresh White Kitchen

Fresh White KitchenView in gallery
dusti j design

Sometimes all a kitchen needs is a new coat of paint to make the most of the space. This kitchen already had all the necessary elements but got a big upgrade with High Reflective White.

Thie white walls make a big difference in amplifying the plentiful natural light.

All-White Entry

All-White EntryView in gallery
lafayetteave

It’s a similar story with this entryway alcove. The area does not have much natural light and the bright white makes it feel more open and welcoming.

High Reflective White in this space may look a little warmer and that’s because of the rich wood floor and other elements. They paint reflects the warmer tones in the wood.

Classic White Cabinetry

Classic White CabinetryView in gallery
oakhillfarmhouse

High Reflective White is a classic choice for cabinetry, in the kitchen and elsewhere.

This family room has a full wall of built-ins that were painted in this high reflective color. Note that the trim in the room is also the same color, which ties everything together.

This white paint is also a good match for the cooler wood floor and greige on the walls.

Bright Bedrooms

Bright BedroomsView in gallery
Kylie M. E-design DIY Educator

Black and white is a perennial favorite combination that is even more appealing with High Reflective White walls.

The bright natural lighting emphasizes the stark white color and together they create a very airy, sunny bedroom.

A spare yet comfortable vibe is ideal for this color combo.

Bright Color Pairing

Bright Color PairingView in gallery
Amanda | Home Decor & Design

For a stand-out kitchen try combining an all-white color palette with a bright pop of color.

Kitchen cabinets, trim and the ceiling painted High Reflective White are the perfect background for the green island. In fact, the green hue family emphasizes the crisp nature of High Reflective White paint.

Custom Kitchen Style

Custom Kitchen StyleView in gallery
Claros Painting & Drywall

A modern kitchen with a Scandinavian flair sports and all-white palette. However, it is two different shades of white.

The ceilings are High Reflective White but the white walls are Chantilly Lace from Benjamin Moore. Chantilly Lace has an LRV of 92.2, just a smidge lower than the ceiling.

Bathroom Beauty

Bathroom BeautyView in gallery
kitchen & bath CRATE

For a crisp look in the bathroom, you can go wrong painting walls High Reflective White.

This paint is a great match for the marble vanity and a strong counterpoint to the dark wood cabinets.

Bright White Subway Tile

Bright White Subway TileView in gallery
Martha O’Hara Interiors

White subway tile is a brilliant white so High Reflective White paint is a great choice for a monochrome look.

Despite the dark floor, cabinet and countertop, the bathroom is light and bright thanks to the highly reflective white paint color.

Office-Appropriate

Office-AppropriateView in gallery
Tom Curren Companies

A home office that feels professional and is distraction-free is easy to achieve with an all-white environment.

This clean loft space is ideal for an office with a coat of Sherwin Williams High Reflective White.

Modern Trim Color

Modern Trim ColorView in gallery
Selle Valley Construction, Inc.

A minimalist, modern home in Seattle shows how versatile white paint colors are.

This staircase area has trim in High Reflective White and the walls are Sherwin Williams Snowbound. The wall color is a good deal less reflective with an LRV of 83, making it. asofter white.

Togerhter, the white complement one another and the difference is not stark.

Open-Plan Perfect

Open-Plan PerfectView in gallery
Tina Ramchandani Creative

For a perfect paint color in a large open-plan space, consider High Reflective White. It can create a monochrome back drop for a light and airy minimalist space that still feels welcoming.

This room is painted all in this reflective color and the result is stunning.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)FAQ

What undertones does SW High reflective white have?

This is a neutral, pure white paint that has almost no undertones. It goes with almost all colors. If you have a room that’s beige, however, you will want to consider a white with more warmth. Beige and pure white together can look like a stark combination.

What is the difference between high reflective white and extra white?

Sherwin Williams Extra White (SW 7006) is among the brightest whites and has an LRV of 86. On the other hand, High Reflective White ranks at 93 on the LRV scale and is a very stark white.

Is high reflective white good for ceilings?

Sherwin Williams High Reflective White is not only good for trim but also for ceilings. Paint the ceiling in a matte finish and use a satin type for trim, built-ins and other accent areas.

What is the brightest white Behr paint?

Some people want an alternative to High Reflective White because they don’t have a Sherwin Williams store nearby. If looking to the Behr brand, you’ll want Behr Ultra Pure White. With a LRV of 94, it’s quite bright and leans to the cool side of the spectrum.

Is Sherwin Williams High Reflective White good for cabinets?

If your material palette includes quartz or marble countertops and the color palette is cool, High Reflective White is an optimal choice. Its lack of undertones and stark look is an ideal match.

Conclusion

Shopping for white paint can be confusing between tal. he undertones, soft whites and crisp whites. Sherwin Williams High Reflective White paint is ideal for most all trim and cabinetry and even for walls. It stays true to its white nature without any major undertones.

Test some samples in your own space and you’ll see how it can kick up the color palette.