DIY Floor Mirror Frame

I am always looking to update my home, make it as fancy and custom as possible. Without breaking the bank. Having one of those floor mirror frames with a great chunky frame on it is something I always eye when in furniture stores. I decided to make a leaning mirror instead of buying. This is a really simple project, with a huge impact.

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I decided on the look I wanted for the mirror. I had a existing long mirror that stands about 4 feet high. It is frame less. The supplies I used were:

  • One pine board, enough to leave a edges of about 4 inches on the sides of the mirror
  • 4 trim pieces (this is all particular to your specific style) I chose a simple sloped trim piece. These will be framing the larger board.
  • 4 detailed interior trim pieces, this will be framing the mirror itself
  • Desired dark stain, only a small amount was needed

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To begin, the first step is cutting the board down to size. Most likely finding one with specific measurements won’t happen. I needed to cut off of the top, but the sides were just what I needed. Using a table saw and running the board through the saw. You can also use a standard hand held saw and slice through as well if the board is not too thick. Mine is 1 inch thick. The board itself is about 4 inches wider on the 4 sides then the mirror itself. Just enough to add drama and finishing the frame.

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Setting the mirror in the middle of the newly cut large board, it is time to measure and cut the trim pieces. Setting them in the designated spots around the mirror. Then marking where to cut.

I set my table saw at a 45 degree angle, allowing the corner to meet flush. Then pushing down and cutting the corners. Making sure the one is a correct cut, then measuring the other side and doing the same.

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I did this for the 4 smaller detailed trim to frame the mirror itself. And repeated the process for the simple trim to frame the larger board. If you don’t have a table saw to measure a 45 degree cut you can always cut the pieces a little longer and one side and have the two ends meed the corner without the 45. Both ways will frame the mirror fine.

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Once all were cut it is time to stain. I chose a dark walnut stain. I have used this in the past and it gives a rich and dark feel to the wood. Laying each piece down on a surface covered with something to keep the stain contained.

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I did not have to sand the pieces because they were untreated. If your wood is treated a simple light sanding with sand paper will do the trick and get it ready to be stained. Taking my gloved hand and dipping the rag in the stain. Wringing it out in the stain can. Then wiping the rag along the wood, going from side to side along the grain of the wood.

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Moving quick and rubbing the stain in. If there is any dripping, wipe it quickly with the rag and it should blend into the wood fine. I did this for the large board and the outer trim pieces.

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While those were drying I took the smaller, detailed trim pieces that will frame the mirror itself. I wanted to spray paint them white. Using the can and keeping it a few inches away from the trim and running it along the trim itself.

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Both stain and paint I only did one coat on. The more coats you do the less the wood grain will show through. I always feel that if you do more coats it will make the piece feel more modern and contemporary. Less stain coats make it feel more rustic. It is all preference. Unless the piece will have a lot of wear and tear one coat is fine.

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Once they were all dry it is time attach the mirror to the large board. Using standard wood glue. I first measured and marked specifically where the mirror should be placed. making sure each side is even.

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Once marked, I poured wood glue all over  the surface where the mirror will sit. Then place the mirror on it and push it in. I then grabbed two baskets full of books and set it on top of the mirror to give it weight and help the glue do its job. I kept it like that for about 4 hours. Each wood glue is different though, so read the instructions for your specific glue.

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Now it was time to assemble the mirror. Lining up each trim piece and nailing them in. I used a small nail on each end of trim pieces and one in the center. It got the job done.

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This mirror was what I was going for. A blend or rustic, and contemporary. I feel like the two toned with the white and the dark stain make it pop.

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It creates a feeling of the mirror being a though out full piece for the home.

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When looking to create a custom look for something, creating it yourself is always the more cost effective way to go.

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