How to Install a Ceiling-Mounted Shower Curtain

My friend once mentioned that her favorite designs include unexpected details. The bathroom is often a fairly predictable space, design-wise. But one way to increase the drama, sophistication, and height of a bathroom is to mount the shower curtain from the ceiling. Bringing décor strategies from other rooms into the bathroom is both unexpected and delightful, and a ceiling-mounted shower curtain is no exception.

Ceiling Mount Shower CurtainView in gallery

Ceiling Mount Shower Curtain InstallView in gallery

The process is fairly straightforward with the Ikea Kvartal system, and this tutorial shares some tips that will help to make your own installation easier and faster.

Ceiling Mount Shower Curtain - suppliesView in gallery

Materials Needed:

  • Triple track rail(s). Note: Number needed will vary based upon your tub surround / shower size; however, for the standard-sized tub shown in this tutorial, two (2) Kvartal triple track rails were needed.
  • Ceiling mount brackets. Note: Number needed may vary based upon the placement of your ceiling studs. This tutorial uses four (4) brackets – two on the ends and two in the middle.
  • Two (2) boxes of curtain glides.
  • Screws for mounting mount brackets.
  • Drywall anchors (optional).

Ceiling Mount Shower Curtain - kvartalView in gallery

Ceiling Mount Shower Curtain-thin cardboardView in gallery

Begin by finding the studs in your ceiling. If you have a popcorn or textured ceiling (I feel your pain), this can be tricky because a stud finder requires a flat surface to read accurately. Tip: Place a flat piece of thin cardboard, such as a cereal box, against the ceiling, and run your stud finder over that.

Ceiling Mount Shower Curtain-mark studView in gallery

Mark your studs with a tack or pin. Or a pencil, if that’s what you prefer.

Because this ceiling had two studsView in gallery

Because this ceiling had two studs reasonably spaced, it was decided to use two inner ceiling mount brackets on the studs instead of one in the center with a drywall anchor.

Ceiling Mount Shower Curtain-mountView in gallery

Wherever you don’t have a ceiling stud in the position you want to mount your track, you’ll need to install drywall anchors. To do this, drill a hole just large enough to fit the drywall anchor snugly – no bigger. Tip: If you’re drilling your end holes this way, be sure to allow for at least a 1-1/8” (Ikea recommends 1-3/8”) spacing coming in from EACH wall.

Push the anchor in with your fingersView in gallery

Push the anchor in with your fingers as far as you can, then hammer it in the rest of the way until the opening is flush with the ceiling.

slightly enlarge your holeView in gallery

If your anchor starts to bend or distort, your hole isn’t big enough. Pull it out and slightly enlarge your hole with your drill bit. The anchor should hold its shape and look like this, ready for a screw.

loosen the metal bracketsView in gallery

Because you will be cutting both tracks, loosen the metal brackets from the ceiling (top) side of your triple track by loosening the screws with the provided allen wrench.

Ceiling Mount Shower Curtain-remove the bracketsView in gallery

Remove the brackets from the track.

Hold up a piece of the trackView in gallery

Hold up a piece of the track between your two end points (which should be at least 1-1/8” away from the wall) to serve as a straight-edge. Using your stud-marked pins as a guide, mark the desired mounting points on the straight line between your two end points.

Measure the widthView in gallery

Measure the width of your shower curtain space. In most cases, this will be the wall-to-wall width of your bathtub.

Ceiling Mount Shower Curtain-do the mathView in gallery

If you haven’t already, determine the true length of your to-be shower curtain track. This involves the wall-to-wall width of your tub, minus the gap spacing (Ikea recommends 1-3/8” at least; this tutorial used 1-1/8” with some tweaking, described later).

cut two triple tracksView in gallery

Because the true length is longer than 55”, we’ll need to cut two triple tracks and join them together. Determine the best spot for a joint. You should place a joint on a stud, where possible, on the side where the shower liner and curtain will move the least (if applicable), and where it will be least visible, although the joint is hardly visible even after installation.

measure the distanceView in gallery

Once you’ve determined the joint position, measure the distance from one end point to the joint position. Add at least 1/2″ to this measurement. Tip: The amount you add depends on the gap distance you chose from your walls; this amount will be the track’s “overhang” from your end mount position. The larger your gap distance, the larger your addition can/should be so your track ends up about 3/4″ away from the wall itself.

Mark this distance on both sidesView in gallery

Mark this distance on both sides of your track. This tutorial had a 19” space from the end hole to the joint position, plus 1/2″, making the cut mark on the track fall at the 19-1/2” point.

Grab a hacksawView in gallery

Grab a hacksaw (or Kvartal miter box and saw) and carefully cut a straight and perpendicular edge at your marked point. Carefully repeat the measurement and additions for the other half/side of your track rail, and cut your second track piece.

Ceiling Mount Shower Curtain-two pieces cutView in gallery

Two pieces cut.

As careful as you areView in gallery

As careful as you are, you’ll probably notice that the saw creates fairly raw, rough edges. That’s okay.

Place the two factory-cut edgesView in gallery

Place the two factory-cut edges together to form your joint; this will ensure the most precise alignment of the track, which makes for smoother curtain movement. The saw-cut edges will be covered by end caps.

Put the ends of a bracketView in gallery

Put the ends of a bracket into the grooves on the ceiling-sides of the track rails.

Unscrew the mounting boltView in gallery

Unscrew the mounting bolt from the ceiling mount bracket using the wrench provided.

Set the bracket asideView in gallery

Set the bracket aside; you just need the bolt for this step.

Set the mounting boltView in gallery

Set the mounting bolt into the groove on the ceiling-side of the track rail directly over the metal bracket’s center.

Slide the track railsView in gallery

Slide the track rails together so the mounting bolt sits directly at the joint.

Use the wrench to tightenView in gallery

Use the wrench to tighten the screws on the metal bracket, to hold it in place. The mounting bolt will be able to glide back and forth slightly between the two middle screws; this is fine.

If you are installing other middle mountingView in gallery

If you are installing other middle mounting bolts on your track rail, repeat these steps for those. Measure the middle bolts’ positions based upon the marks on your ceiling. There will be some wiggle room (about 1/4″ to 1/2″), so these don’t have to be dead-on, but they should be fairly accurate to save you time in the long run.

Slide your end metal bracketsView in gallery

Slide your end metal brackets onto the track rail, but don’t tighten them yet. Push the end caps onto the saw-cut ends of your track rail.

Slide the bracketView in gallery

Slide the bracket up next to the end cap attachment.

Before you tighten your end bracketsView in gallery

Before you tighten your end brackets too severely at this point, you should be aware of where your mounting bolt hits in relation to the end of your track rail. You can remove screws from the metal bracket as needed to make space for the mounting bolt. For example, you could remove one of the middle metal bracket screws so the bolt can slide closer to the edge of the track rail.

Another configuration ideaView in gallery

Another configuration idea, if you need the mounting bolt to be particularly close to the end of your track rail, is to remove the very end metal bracket screw and install screws on the other four threaded holes instead. This is the configuration used by this tutorial, but yours may vary based upon your measurements and setup with your ceiling’s end-holes.

Install a ceiling mount bracketView in gallery

Install a ceiling mount bracket at one of your marked points. The screw for this is not provided by the Kvartal system, but pretty much any drywall screw (that fit into the drywall anchors, if applicable) with a raised screw head will work.

Adjust the mount bracketView in gallery

Adjust the mount bracket so that the tightening screw faces toward the bathtub or shower.

mount bracketsView in gallery

Repeat this for all the mount brackets.

install your actual shower curtainView in gallery

If you are not ready at this point to install your actual shower curtain and liner, skip ahead in this tutorial to the actual mounting of the track rail itself. However, if you’re ready to go with your curtain and liner, now is the time. Take two glide pieces from your box, one that has a hook and the other that looks like a miniature train.

Ceiling Mount Shower Curtain-join themView in gallery

Join them together.

Slide the open hook onto the topView in gallery

Slide the open hook onto the top of your shower curtain or shower liner. Repeat for as many as your curtain/liner needs.

close the clipsView in gallery

Lock the glide hook closed.

Taking care to keep your trackView in gallery

Taking care to keep your track oriented correctly so the joint falls on the correct mounting spot, determine which of the three tracks will hold your shower liner (or curtain). Remember that the liner goes closer to the bathtub, and the curtain goes on the outer track. Remove the end cap from one end of your track rail. Slide a metal end-stop (included in your glide box) down into the appropriate track to the far end.

Slide your shower curtainView in gallery

Slide your shower curtain or liner glides onto the track. (Speaking of shower curtains…check out this article on how to customize pretty shower curtains.)

Position your second metal end-stoView in gallery

Position your second metal end-stop at this end of your track, and tighten in place using the provided wrench. Tighten your first metal end-stop at the other end of your track as well. Complete this process for both your shower curtain and shower liner. Replace the end cap onto your track rail.

Position the mounting boltsView in gallery

Have a helper hold the track up to your ceiling mount brackets. Position the mounting bolts so they all slide into their respective brackets at the same time. Tighten the tightening screws on the side of your ceiling mount brackets.

center mounting bracketsView in gallery

Tip: As you’re tightening, I recommend working from the center mounting brackets outward to the ends. This makes it easier to keep all mounting bolts in place without falling out as you tightened the tightening screws.

Notice the tightening screwView in gallery

Notice the tightening screws are all facing toward the bathtub/shower, which makes for a cleaner look from the rest of the bathroom.

installed track railView in gallery

Here’s what your installed track rail looks like without the shower curtain and liner, if you went that route.

Ceiling Mount Shower Curtain-installed track railView in gallery

Here’s what your installed track rail might look like with the shower curtain and liner. Notice that a gap was left intentionally at the top of the shower curtain for venting; you may choose to raise your curtain higher to cover the track completely.

Ceiling Mount Shower Curtain installedView in gallery

Check to make sure your shower curtain and liner glide smoothly, particularly across your joint. The shower liner will get lots of movement. The beauty of this system is that the shower curtain, really, can stay put if you’ve opted for the unexpected, and dramatic, split-curtain look.

ceiling-mounted shower curtainView in gallery

A ceiling-mounted shower curtain looks so beautiful, with all its height and formality. It really increases the grown-up feel of the bathroom space.

Ceiling Mount Shower Curtain- lighting to be replacedView in gallery

It also draws our eyes upward…sadly, to this unfortunate lighting fixture. Which will be replaced ASAP for something less of an eyesore.

Note: The author is an experienced, although not professional, DIYer. Neither the author nor Homedit is responsible for any injury or damage that may be a result of following this tutorial.