The Travertine Perfect Home in Singapore

At some point, we all dream about the perfect home. Most of us imagine it with large bedrooms, bright interiors and with a large and beautiful pool. But imagine how wonderful it would be to simply step out of the house and jump right into the pool. It’s a dream that the owners of this house get to call reality. This is the Travertine Dream House. It’s located in Serangoon, Singapore and it was designed by Wallflower Architecture + Design.

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The house was completed in 2011. It has a contemporary design with simple lines and functionally structured interior. The client requested a simple house with lots of usable space and that would also incorporate a greenery. The residence was organized into two volumes. There are two parallel blocks and they are connected by a glass bridge. This transition area allows lots of natural light to get inside. Also, to protect the house from the heat, the walls are covered with thick travertine and with large overhangs on the western side.

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The interior of the house is functionally structured. For example, the entry area, the living spaces and the bedrooms are longitudinally arranged in order to take advantage of the natural cross ventilation and the daylight. The house has a total of four levels and one of them is sunk into the ground. The living and the dining areas are located on the ground floor and they overlook the swimming pool and the fish pond. The basement is for entertainment and it also includes a guest room. The third level houses a recreational deck and a roof garden.

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The overall design is modern and minimalist. The façade is simple and there’s a continuous juxtaposition of solid and transparent elements. The windows are very large and they can actually be considered glass walls. They provide natural daylight while also allowing the inhabitants to enjoy panoramic views of the surrounding area.{found on archdaily and pics by Jeremy San}.