The Old Meets the New and Vice Versa at Cruscha Alba

The big cities have always attracted the tourists with their charming historic parts that represent the roots of development of that city and the origins of its inhabitants. The particular architectural structure of the city, the way life exists here or the kind f people that populate these areas are elements that characterize these particular places. Whether you choose to go to Rome, Paris, Madrid or Bucharest their historic parts will speak to you of their origins and history.

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In the Gotico area, the historic part of Barcelona, Spain there is a charming flat designed by Gus Wüstemann where cruscha alba is the representative element of this place where the old meets the new and vice versa. It is a spacious apartment which can be used as loft or three bedroom apartment.

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The structural element, the cruscha alba is a crossing of two spaces where there is no circulation. It represents the basic core of the back part of this apartment, a border between the old elements and the new ones. This white cross is an implemented new volume in the existing space where can be found new openings. Here you can discover the white and modern kitchen and bathroom, two spaces that are an explosion of light and brightness.

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A major structural wall separates the living area from the white cross and the private areas of the apartment. Two door size openings and a window to a light patio are the only connection to the living area, dividing the flat in two parts. For the rest of the apartment, the original state of the walls and ceilings was kept. You can notice the raw stone walls, old paintings and even the raw plaster finishes that appear all over the place. The integrated lighting and the small number of pieces of furniture make of this place a mysterious and attractive one.{found on archdaily and pics by Bruno}.