Stylish Greenhouse Design Inspiration

Simple greenhouse kits are relatively easy to put together and install. They are usually made up of an aluminium supporting structure into which you slide glass panels. However, the look leaves something to be desired. These sorts of greenhouse kits are perfectly practical but most gardeners end up try to hide them away behind hedging.

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Not only does this interrupt the light flow into the greenhouse, which is counter productive, but does away with the idea of making the greenhouse a central feature of the garden. Why not install a more visually satisfying greenhouse that becomes an eye catching part of the garden’s architecture?

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Well designed greenhouses can double as a nursery, a conservatory or act as summerhouse. Indeed, instead of tucking your greenhouse away, out of sight at the bottom of the garden, why not install it right next to the main building, extending it? So long as the greenhouse faces the southernmost aspect it will work well even if it next to your home.

Double Storey Style.

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Architecturally pleasing when positioned anywhere close to the main residence, a double height greenhouse also offers certain advantages. Of course, a taller green house means that you will be able to grow bigger plants. Some large tropical foliage plants, that would die out of doors, will soon fill up the extra headspace. Because there is more air trapped in a double height greenhouse, it is less susceptible to problematic rapid changes in temperature.

The Traditional Look.

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Old fashioned they may be, but there is nothing wrong with a vintage style greenhouse. Even in more modern setting, greenhouses that have a traditional, even nineteenth century look, will work well. To get the traditional look, use a brick built or stone base, with a white painted superstructure. Metal frames and wooden ones are equally acceptable for the classic style greenhouse.

Greenhouses As Part Of The Home.

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Greenhouses are not just outbuildings, architecturally distinct from the rest of the property. Indeed, if your home has a central courtyard area, then there is no good reason not to give that space over to glass-covered planting. If your greenhouse is next to the main building, use some design cues to make them work together, such as a similar pitch to the roof line. This will work equally well in traditional and contemporary homes. And if you want to connect the main home to an out building or a detached garage, why not opt for a glazed canopy, so that you have a mini-greenhouse as a bonus?

Three Glazed Walls.

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Greenhouses do not need to be stand alone structures. So long as you have a glazed roof and three glazed walls, the fourth wall does not need to be transparent. The unglazed wall ought to be the most northerly facing to get the best results. If you have a stone wall exterior to your home, install a greenhouse that butts up to it. The wall will warm up during the day and continue to heat the greenhouse overnight.

The Greenhouse Outhouse.

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Greenhouses are not just for ardent horticulturalists. They should be enjoyed by all. A good greenhouse will work as a nursery for bedding plants, be able to display more tender plants and still remain a place that you can hang out in. To ensure you, or your plants, don’t overheat in high summer ensure you have plenty of ventilation in the glazed roof as well as at the sides. Sit back, relax and enjoy.

Picture sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11.