How To Use Hedges In Contemporary Exteriors

Hedges have traditionally been grown in gardens to mark divisions. Mostly, they are grown at the extreme edge of a property so that the boundary is marked. They are brilliant at creating a natural-looking division, in places where you would not want to use a fence. Many thorny hedges also create a deterrent against unwanted access, since they are difficult to traverse.

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However, the use of hedges only at the edge of a property is a bit old fashioned and hedging can be used for many more purposes than simple boundary marking. Indeed, used at the perimeter of a garden, hedges can be applied in new ways that serve their purpose and add something new to the landscape design.

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Hedges also look great when they form the back drop for other plants, setting the scene. If you are planning a new flower bed for your garden, why not grow a hedge towards the area of it to create a green background for it? Hedges are not just for old fashioned gardens!

The Double Hedge.

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Hedges are a great way to create privacy in your garden. Grow one behind a set of railings to create an unoverlooked area in your home’s garden so that you can enjoy it without being seen from the street.

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However, to give the look a contemporary twist, grow a shorter hedge in front the one that is providing you privacy, for a double-hedge look. You don’t need to grow a shrub, to get the double hedge look. Tall growing grasses, set out in front of a privet hedge, for instance, also work well.

Light It Up.

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For an on trend look that suits hedges down to the ground, install some lighting. If you have used hedges in your garden to create walkways, use the plants to support some external lighting. Simply daisy-chain your lights through the hedges so that they are lit up when night falls. Hedges and trees make for the ideal way of installing exterior lighting with the minimum of fuss.

Low Level Hedging.

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If you want to mark a division in a contemporary garden between two distinct zones, but don’t want to shut areas off from one another, go for a low level hedge. They look so much more natural than a dwarf brick wall. Low level hedging will mean that you can maintain an open vista without compromising on the structure of a garden. Use low level hedges at the boundaries of flower beds, patios and underneath windows for the perfect look.

Formality.

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Formal gardens are not just for old fashioned exteriors. Many landscape designers create separate rooms within gardens with distinct characteristics for differing purposes.

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Hedging is the ideal way of creating walkways, or corridors, between these zones. Box hedging, for instance, makes for the ideal element to lay either side of a path, or to surround a sculpture, giving it a natural plinth. If you have herb garden, surround it with hedging to offer it some protection from wind in the winter months as well as making it feel like a distinct room in the garden.

Picture sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10.