How To Use Copper In Your Kitchen’s Design

Copper is a metallic element which his put to use all over modern homes. Because copper has fantastic thermal conductivity it is likely to be used in your home’s central heating system. Likewise, copper is a great electrical conductor so is probably used in your home’s electrical installation. However, copper is less used in domestic settings for its decorative appeal.

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The metal, and its alloys, has been used right back to Roman times and it certainly does not look out of place in a home. It is, perhaps, best put to use in exteriors, as flashing, downspouts or roofing. When it comes to interiors, it is a great addition to kitchen designs. Copper’s distinctive coloring is not the only reason to utilize it in a food preparation context. The metal has anti bacterial properties that should not be overlooked, making the kitchen the ideal place to use it.

Copper Surfaces.

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Counter tops get a sheen and a glow if they are covered in copper. The material not only looks great but is easy to wipe down and to maintain. Copper can be bent around edges, so you can simply clad your existing counter tops with the material, should you wish. Remember that copper will discolor a little with age but this, to be frank, only adds to its charm. The reflective nature of a metal counter top will give a kitchen a shimmer, making it surprisingly effective in modern kitchen designs.

Fittings.

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Taps and faucets don’t have to look old fashioned if you choose to stray from the ever popular chromes and stainless steels. Copper is a great material for water works. Weathered copper looks great for sink fittings and which will age well. Try using a copper faucet over a copper sink to achieve a coordinated look.

Lamps.

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If you have added a copper faucet, sink or counter top to your kitchen then why not add to the look with some light fittings in the same material? Copper has been a popular choice with exterior light fittings, because of its weather resistant properties, but they look great indoors, too. Suspended copper lamp fittings will do the job in a copper-inspired kitchen.

Dark Coppers.

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Copper is not just a light, shiny metal but can be specified in a range of colors. As a rule of thumb, darker coppers look better in traditional kitchens, whilst lighter ones are more suited to contemporary rooms. Use a darker copper for a textured range hood or for a rustic looking sink.

Sanitary Cooking Material.

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Numerous anti microbial studies have been conducted over the last decade into copper’s ability to destroy unwanted fungal spores and a wide range of bacteria, as well as viruses such as influenza. Even if you don’t want to convert your kitchen’s counter tops to copper, it can still be used elsewhere, providing a sanitary material for food preparation.

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Use a copper bowl, recessed in island unit for washing fruit and vegetables. This is a great way of separating food washing from pot washing. Copper pots will help your cooking and destroy unwanted germs. Some hanging copper pots set off metalic working surfaces perfectly.

New Approaches.

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Since copper has been so long used it may be hard to find ways to use it in original ways. However, most metal workers will be able to fabricate something new with copper.

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How about a bespoke quilted look for the recess behind a stove? Or why not use conventional stainless steel fittings and set them off against copper walls on the side of an island unit or a bar? And for a more subtle approach, seek out vintage some copper cake molds and use them for decoration on your kitchen’s walls.

Picture sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12.