What is Hemlock Wood?

Sometimes referred to as Tsuga, Hemlock wood comes from a plant called poison hemlock – medium to large evergreen trees with scaly bark.

What is Hemlock Wood

These trees adapt to cool temperatures and are popular among horticulturalists.

For years, hemlock wood provided uses in the leather tanning and fur industries due to its acidic nature. For homeowners, hemlock wood has multiple uses inside and outside the home.

Other Uses for Hemlock Wood

Hemlock wood is thick and durable, making it an excellent option for flooring. Since hemlock grows in damp areas, it provides a natural level of moisture resistance. Manufacturers add other products to it, furthering hemlock’s ability to resist water.

Hemlock is also a great choice for subfloors. No matter how well-insulated your floors are, your subfloors must provide resistance to moisture. 

Other Uses for Hemlock Wood

In the world of roofing, hemlock wood is a popular product. Not only does it lend itself to the joists that determine your roof’s steepness (sometimes referred to as “pitch”), but hemlock wood provides a great sheathing option. Sheathing refers to the layer of wood that lays flat against the joists. The sheathing (sometimes called “decking”) gives the underlayment, roof finish, and other parts of your roof a smooth, flat surface to attach to.

Thanks to its natural grains and pliable nature, Hemlock fir also has uses in the furniture-making industry. In addition to furniture, many carpenters use hemlock for door frames, window frames, and staircase banisters.

Benefits of Hemlock Lumber

The greatest benefit of hemlock is its strength. While you should avoid hemlock that contains knots, smooth-grain hemlock is one of the strongest lumber choices on the market.

Even though pine is popular for the studs that serve as your walls’ framing, pine is a soft wood that sometimes warps. Hemlock rarely twists or warps, which is important for the structural soundness of your home.

Another benefit is that Hemlock’s natural, light color allows it to take on paints and stains. Turning the wood finishes in your home into what you want is an integral part of achieving your ideal home décor.

When choosing the materials to use on and in your home, you probably wonder about affordability. While recent price increases have impacted hemlock, it still costs less than many types of lumber.

Once you choose the constructionist, who will work on your home, discuss using hemlock wood. Its variety of uses and a long list of benefits.