How To Incorporate Geometric Designs Into Your Home

Geometry is used all through home design. The layout of most homes includes many right angles laid out, oftentimes, in a regular fashion. Windows, walls and ceilings all tend to conform to well established geometric patterns. Formal gardens are often laid out in ways that are derived from mathematical formulae. If a geometrically precise, minimalist sort of look is too much for you, learn how to incorporate regular designs in a way that is not too severe.

Try Triangles.

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Every schoolkid knows that a triangle has three sides and that the ancient Greeks were obsessed with their mysterious properties. You don’t find many triangular rooms to test your interior decorating skills. However, triangles, which offer a strong structural shape, are often used by civil engineers with bridges, balconies and balustrades. If your home has any of these elements it is a likely a triangle will have been used. If so, reflect this with the design of the nearby spaces.

Tessellating Tiling.

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Tiling tends to be sold in a geometric form, either a rectangle or a square, but there’s no need to stick to a regular pattern to get the geometrically inspired look. Use a combination of squares and rectangles to prevent your tessellating patterns becoming too dull. Likewise, find floor tiles with a visual motif that cuts across the pattern made by the tiles themselves. Tiling offers the perfect opportunity to create an orderly look whilst still doing something novel with their usual appearance.

Hexagonal Heaven.

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Like squares and rectangles, the honeycomb look of a hexagon covers surfaces very effectively because it natural tessellates. The look of a group of hexagons works particularly well with carpet which must twist and turn around awkward shapes where, for instance, stripes would not be suitable. It is equally at home when used as a vinyl floor covering in a kitchen or a bathroom. And, for a more engaging approach, try it as a feature wall covering. This is ideal for a dining room, especially if you use hexagonal plates or place mats, too.

Zig Zags.

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Diagonals don’t always work well in interior designs, particularly if the room is smaller, as it can create the effect of everything being out of kilter. A better approach to take is to use zig zags instead so that the look is more balanced. Zig zagged flooring won’t make your room look too small and is relatively easy to put in place. Chevrons are also well worth considering for a bedroom wall covering. Wallpaper tends to suit zig zag designs and it is the perfect thing to use in a teenagers bedroom.

Exceptional Exteriors.

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Don’t neglect your home’s exterior when it comes to geometry. Natural looking gardens are given a lift by a geometric feature. Try to blend natural curves with some hard and fast lines to get the best effect.

Picture sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5&6, 7, 8, 9 and 10.